Photo Archives

A selection of historic photographs from the life of Homer Lea. 
(Please click any thumbnail to open the high resolution version of each.)

HLRS-10001. Alfred E. Lea, circa 1880.

Source: History of Clear Creek and Boulder Valleys, Colorado 
(Chicago: O. L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers, 1880)

HLRS-10002. Hersa Lea, circa 1875.

Source: Personal Papers of Mr. and Mrs. James D. Lea, Houston, Texas.​

HLRS-10003. Hersa Lea's grave.

Location: Riverside Cemetery, 5201 Brighton Blvd., Denver Colorado. Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.


HLRS-10004. Lea family grave

Lee’s Summit Cemetery, 806 Southeast 3rd Street, Lee’s Summit, Missouri 64063. In the foreground are the graves of Alfred E. Lea and his second wife Emma Wilson Lea. The graves on the far left are those of Dr. P.J.G. Lea and his wife Lucinda.

HLRS-10005. Homer Lea (born November 17, 1876) in infancy.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10006. Homer Lea age 12.

Source: History of Clear Creek and Boulder Valleys, Colorado (Chicago: O. L. Baskin & Co.,
Historical Publishers, 1880)

HLRS-10007. National Surgical Institute.

Homer Lea, at about age 12, went to the National Surgical Institute in Indianapolis, which specialized in treating deformities, to receive treatment for his affliction.

Source: National Surgical Institute Brochure, circa 1885.

HLRS-10008. Emma Rice Wilson.

Emma Rice Wilson married Alfred E. Lea on July 16, 1890. This photo was taken some time between 1890 and 1894, when the Lea’s lived in Denver.

Source: Robert G. Wilson Personal Papers, 408 Century Plaza Building, Wichita, Kansas.

HLRS-10009. Ethel Bryant Powers, circa late 1890s

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10010. East Denver High School.

Homer Lea completed his freshman year (1892-1893) at East Denver High School in Colorado.

Source: East Denver High School Post Card, No. C3121, Colorado News Company,
Denver, Col., circa 1890s.

HLRS-10011. University of the Pacific

In the fall of 1893, Homer Lea enrolled for his sophomore high school year in the college preparatory academy of the University of the Pacific, a small Methodist-Episcopal college near San Jose, California, not far from his maternal grandmother’s residence.

Source: University of the Pacific, San Jose, Cal, Post Card, No. 5112, E. von Bardeleben, New York and Germany, circa 1900.

HLRS-10012. Los Angeles High School.

Homer Lea attended Los Angeles High School (located west of North Hill Street and below the south side of Fort Moore Hill) from 1894 to1896.

Source: In and About Los Angeles (Los Angeles: E.P. Charlton & Co., 1906).

HLRS-10013. Homer Lea at the residence of Marco Newmark, a Los Angeles High School friend, circa 1894-1895.

Source: Personal Papers, Mr. and Mrs. James D. Lea, Houston, Texas.

HLRS-10014. Homer Lea, age 20, as a Los Angeles High School senior.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York..

HLRS-10014a. Ermal Lea as a student at the University of California, Los Angeles, 1903.

Source: University of California, Los Angeles Yearbook, 1903.

HLRS-10014b. Hersa Lea as a Senior, Summer Class, Los Angeles High School, 1900.

Source: Los Angeles High School Yearbook, 1900.

HLRS-10015. The 900 block of South Bonnie Brae Street; the Leas lived at no. 918.

Source: Post Card, 1906.

HLRS-10016. The Rubaiyat, by Omar Khayam (Fitzgerald).

Homer Lea loved poetry and the Rubaiyat by Persian poet Omar Khayyam ranked among his favorite readings, which he often carried with him.

Source: Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (Boston, J.R. Osgood & Co., 1878). First American Edition.

HLRS-10017. Westlake Park.

Homer Lea often studied on the lawns of Westlake Park that were just a few blocks from his Bonnie Brae Street home..

Source: Weslake Park, No. 5113, Newman Post Card Co., Los Angeles, CA., circa 1908.

HLRS-10018. Occidental College.

Homer Lea attended Occidental College from September 1896, to June 1897, when the college occupied what had been the old army headquarters building (depicted here, circa 1885) on the east side of Hill Street between Sixth and Seventh streets.

Source: St. Vincent’s College, No. 00031869, Los Angeles Public Library.

HLRS-10019. Central Square Park.

As a freshman at Occidental College (1896-1897) in Los Angeles, Homer Lea participated in debates at nearby Central Square Park.

Source: Central Park, Los Angeles, Western Pub. & Novelty Co., Los Angeles, circa 1912.

HLRS-10020. Stanford University.

Homer Lea attended Stanford University (depicted here in a 1903 photo) from 1897 to 1899 and majored in Economics.

Source: Stanford University Postcard, 1904.

HLRS-10021. Encina Hall.

At Stanford University, Homer Lea resided at Encina Hall, the school’s male dormitory.

Source: Encina Hall Post Card, No. 862, Edward W. Mitchell, San Francisco, Calif., circa 1900.

HLRS-10022. Maclean Hospital.

In May 1899, Lea took a leave of absence from Stanford and checked into San Francisco’s Maclean Hospital (depicted here) for surgery after a riding accident. He contracted small pox at the hospital and subsequently gave up plans to return to Stanford while recuperating at home.

Source: San Francisco Call, November 18, 1896. 

HLRS-10023. Map of China.

Imperial China, circa 1896.

Source: R.H. Macy & Co., Macy’s Atlas of the World (New York: R.H. Macy & Co., 1896).

HLRS-10024. Dowager Empress

In 1898, Dowager Empress Tzu Hsi (depicted here, circa 1900) responded to Emperor Kwang-hsu’s introduction of westernized reforms that were inspired by his advisor K’ang Yu-wei, by placing the Emperor under house arrest and putting a price on K’ang Yu-wei’s head.

Source: Arthur J. Brown, The Chinese Revolution (New York: Student Volunteer Movement, 1912).

HLRS-10025. Emperor Kwang-hsu.

Emperor Kwang-hsu was 26 years old when the Dowager Empress deposed him in 1898. He died two days before the Dowager’s death in November 1908.

Source: Washington Times, November 13, 1908.

HLRS-10026. K’ang Yu-wei, circa 1898.

K’ang Yu-wei, circa 1898.

Source: Philip W. Sargent, The Great Empress Dowager of China (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1911).

HLRS-10027. Robert E. Lee.

Homer Lea successfully sold himself as a military expert to the Chinese Empire Reform Association by claiming he was a relative of the famous Confederate general, Robert E. Lee, which he was not.

Source: Library of Congress No. LC-B8172-001.

HLRS-10028. San Francisco Call (1900).

Sensational San Francisco Call headlines announcing Homer Lea’s intent to lead military forces in China, April 22, 1900.

HLRS-10029. Homer Lea

Homer Lea’s photo from the April 22, 1900 article “Young Californian is Plotting to Become Commander-in-Chief of Chinese Rebel Forces.”

Source: San Francisco Call, April 22, 1900.

HLRS-10030. Steamship China.

On June 22, 1900, Homer Lea boarded the Pacific Mail steamship China(depicted here, circa 1900) in San Francisco, destined for China.

Source: Stereo view card, E. & H.T. Anthony, circa 1900.

HLRS-10031. Grand Hotel Yokohama

On his trip from California to China during the summer of 1900, Homer Lea stayed at the Grand Hotel in Yokohama, Japan, after arrival there on July 11, 1900.

Source: Post Card, circa 1900.

HLRS-10032. Hong Kong Post Card

Post Card Homer Lea sent from Hong Kong to his sister Ermal during his 1900 trip to China.

Source: Personal Papers of Mr. and Mrs. James D. Lea, Houston, Texas.

HLRS-10033. Yamagata

While traveling in China in 1900, Homer Lea met with Baron Yamagata Aritomo (depicted here as a Field Marshal in the early 1890s), a former Japanese prime minister and founder of the modern Japanese army.

Source: H.W. Wilson, Japan’s Fight for Freedom, Vol. 3 (London: Amalgamated Press, 1906).

HLRS-10034. Okuma

Homer Lea met with Count Shigenobu Okuma, a former prime minister and former minister of foreign affairs on January 13, 1901, at his residence outside of Tokyo.

Source: Okuma Shigenobu, Wikipedia.

HLRS-10035. Ito

Homer Lea met with Marquis Ito Hirobumi, another distinguished statesman and former prime minister, who was sympathetic to the Chinese reform cause.

Source: H.W. Wilson, Japan’s Fight for Freedom, Vol. 3 (London: Amalgamated Press, 1906).

HLRS-10036. San Francisco Call (1901)

Sensational San Francisco Call headlines announcing Home Lea’s return as a General in the Chinese Army, April 21, 1901

HLRS-10037. Liang Ch’i-ch’ao

Liang Ch’i-ch-ao, circa 1903.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10038. Pao Huang Hui Medal

Gold medal presented to General Homer Lea by the Los Angeles branch of the Chinese Empire Reform Association (Pao Huang Hui) at the dedication of their new headquarters at 419 Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles, on January 2, 1904. The Chinese inscription on the medal reads: “To comrade General Lea, loyalty and honesty, the comrades of this association give this medal to General Lea.”

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10039. Order of Kwang Hsu Medal

Homer Lea received a gold medal, the “Order of Kwang Hsu,” an eight pointed star, suspended from his neck on a crimson ribbon from K’ang Yu Wei during their 1905 cross-country tour. Lea’s medal was reportedly inscribed: “To Homer Lea from Kang Yu Wei.” The medal had an image of the Emperor on the obverse, and on the reverse were two crossed flags, one with a Chinese dragon representing the Chinese imperial flag, and one with the Pao Haung Hui flag with its three stars representing liberty, education and equality. There was an inscription around the medal’s border saying the medal was presented by the Emperor in his 34th year through K’ang Yu-wei. Beneath the reform flag were the Chinese words “Pao Huang Hui.”

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10040. Homer Lea in Uniform 1904

Lieutenant General Homer Lea, Chinese Empire Reform Association military commander, circa 1904.

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10041. Lea in Chinese attire 1904

Homer Lea in Chinese attire, circa 1904.

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10042. George W. West

George Whitfield West, a former West Point cadet, who became Homer Lea’s first Los Angeles drill instructor for training Chinese Empire Reform Association military cadets in 1904.

Source: Los Angeles Times, October 26, 1912.

HLRS-10043. Western Military Academy Incorporation Articles

Articles of Incorporation of the Western Military Academy, November 23, 1904.

Source: California State Archives, 1020 O Street, Sacramento, California 94244.

HLRS-10044. O’Banion

First Sergeant Ansel. E. O’Banion, Troop A, Fourth Cavalry Regiment, U.S. Army, circa 1902. In 1904, O’Banion became Homer Lea’s principal drill instructor of Chinese Empire Reform Association cadets in Los Angeles.

Source: U.S. Cavalry Museum, Fort Riley, Kansas.

HLRS-10045. Angelus Hotel

Homer Lea periodically had meetings at the Angelus Hotel to plan for Chinese Empire Reform Association military cadet training. He recruited George W. West and Ansel E. O’Banion to be drill instructors at the Angelus Hotel.

Source: Angelus Hotel Post Card, No. 3566, Adolph Seloge Publishing Co., St. Louis-Leipzig-Berlin, circa 1904.

HLRS-10046. O’Banion and Cadets

Ansel O’Banion (white shirt) and Western Military Academy cadets training at Sunset Blvd. and Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, California, August 12, 1904.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10047. Allen Chung

Lieutenant Allen Chung, Chinese Empire Reform Association Army, circa 1905. Chung was the Secretary of the Los Angeles branch of the Chinese Empire Reform Association..

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10048. Chinese Cadets Portland 1905

Chinese Empire Reform Association cadets, Fourth Infantry Regiment, Portland, Oregon, 1905.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10049. CERA Officer St Louis

Unidentified Chinese Empire Reform Association officer, St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1905.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York

HLRS-10050. Fresno CERA Group

Homer Lea (seated) and Fresno Chinese Empire Reform Association officers and their attorney (Standing left to right: Captain Ben. O Young, Captain W.S. Scott, attorney William D. Crichton and Lieutenant E. Curtis Neal), circa 1904-1905.

Source: Fresno Bee, February 21, 1943.

HLRS-10050a. Major George McVicker

Major George McVicker, Chinese cadet drillmaster, New York City, 1903

Source: New York Press, May 3, 1903.

HLRS-10050b. Chinese Empire Reform Association Headquarters

7-9 Mott Street, New York City, circa 1905.

Source: Library of Congress, circa 1905.

HLRS-10051. Richard A. Falkenberg

General Richard A. Falkenberg, who challenged Homer Lea for control of the Chinese Empire Reform Association’s military training arm, and Captain Wong Kim, Chinese Imperial Reform Army, 1904.

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, January 15, 1905.

HLRS-10052. Fernand Parmentier

Fernand Parmentier, a prominent Los Angeles architect with ties to Richard A. Falkenberg, became a lieutenant general and chief of staff of Falkenberg’s “Chinese Imperial Reform Army” in 1904.

Source: Press Reference Library: Notables of the Southwest (Los Angeles: Los Angeles Examiner, 1912).

 

HLRS-10052a. Edmond English

Edmond English, a Civil War veteran with ties to Richard A. Falkenberg, became a major general in the Chinese Imperial Reform Army in 1904 and served as its chief recruiting officer.

Source: Minneapolis Journal, December 21, 1904.

HLRS-10053. Tom She Bin

Dr. T’an Shu-pin (known as Tom She Bin), an affluent herb doctor and president of the San Francisco branch of the Chinese Empire Reform Association, helped Richard Falkenberg in his attempt to undermine Homer Lea.

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, January 15, 1905.

HLRS-10053a. Joseph Singleton (Chu Mon Sing)

New York City reform leader, circa 1905. 

Source: Warner M. Van Norden, Who’s Who of the Chinese in New York, New York, 1918.

HLRS-10054. Theodore Roosevelt

Homer Lea and K’ang Yu-wei met President Theodore Roosevelt in Washington in June 1905, where the president tacitly approved of the Chinese Empire Reform Association’s military training program.

Source: Library of Congress No. LC-H25-5450-V.

HLRS-10055. John E. Wilkie

U.S. Secret Service Chief John E. Wilkie investigated the Chinese Empire Reform Association’s military companies, including a visit to Los Angeles in 1905.

Source: Deseret Evening News, January 16, 1909.

HLRS-10056. Sensational Newspaper Headline

Chinese Empire Reform Association military plans exposed.

Source: Los Angeles Herald, June 25, 1905..

HLRS-10056a. New York Arrival

Homer Lea and Kang Yu-wei arriving in New York City by ferryboat on June 27, 1905.

Source: Anaconda Standard, July 9, 1905.

HLRS-10057. Alexandria Hotel

Homer Lea enjoyed socializing at the elegant Alexandria Hotel
in Los Angeles.

Source: Alexandria Hotel Mezzanine Post Card, No. 3839, M. Rieder, Publ., Los Angeles, circa 1905.

HLRS-10058. Vermilion Pencil, 1908

Source: The Vermilion Pencil (McClure Co. 1908).

HLRS-10059. Streetcar Map

Homer Lea took up temporary residence at a Long Beach cottage situated off the Pacific Electric car line’s Vista Del Mar stop in August 1908, to complete the final chapters of The Valor of Ignorance.

Source: Pacific Electric Timetables, July 1911.

HLRS-10060. Seven Oaks Cabins

Homer Lea stayed at a Seven Oaks Resort cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains when conducting research for The Valor of Ignorance.

Source: Post Card, circa 1910.

HLRS-10061. Adna R. Chaffee

Former U.S. Army Chief of Staff, retired Lieutenant General Adna R. Chaffee (seen here as a Major General of Volunteers during the 1900 Boxer Rebellion) thought very highly of Homer Lea and wrote a glowing introduction to The Valor of Ignorance.

Source: W.A.P. Martin, The Siege in Peking(New York: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1900).

HLRS-10062. Joseph P. Story

Former U.S. Army Chief of Artillery, retired Major General Joseph P. Story (seen here as a colonel, circa 1902), like Adna Chaffee, thought highly of Homer Lea and also wrote a glowing introduction to The Valor of Ignorance.

Source: Robert Arthur, The Coast Artillery School 1824-1927 (Fort Monroe, Virginia: Coast Artillery School Press, 1928).

HLRS-10063. The Valor of Ignorance, 1909

Source: The Valor of Ignorance (Harper & Brothers, 1909).

HLRS-10064. Japanese edition of The Valor of Ignorance

The Japanese edition of The Valor of Ignorance, retitled The Future War Between Japan and America to popularize it in Japan, sold very well in Japan. Homer Lea signed the rights to the Japanese edition over to Sun Yat-sen to help finance Sun Yat-sen’s Chinese revolutionary movement. Lea claimed the book went through 24 editions and sold 26, 000 copies in the first month of its publication in 1911

HLRS-10065. Charles B. Boothe

Charles Beach Booth, a principal member of the “Red Dragon Conspiracy,” seen here, circa 1907.

Source: Charles Amadon Moody, ed., “Makers of Los Angeles,” Out West: A Magazine of the Old Pacific and New, April 1909.

HLRS-10066. Dr. Yung Wing, circa 1910.

Dr. Yung Wing, circa 1910.

Source: World’s Work, July 1910. .

HLRS-10067. J. P. Morgan

On February 2, 1909, a member of Homer Lea’s “Red Dragon” conspiracy tried to solicit financial backing for the conspiracy from businessman J. P. Morgan, who rejected the offer with the replay: “I am ready to do business with any established government on earth but I cannot help to make a government to do business with.”.

Source: Print Collection Portrait File, No. 1701404, New York Public Library.

HLRS-10068. Chalmers Detroit Auto

Homer Lea purchased a new, top-of-the-line Chalmers-Detroit touring car in 1909, which the Oakland Tribune later characterized as “the finest automobile in the city.”

Source:San Francisco Call, September 27, 1908.

HLRS-10070. Lankershim Hotel

June 1911, Dr. Sun Yat-sen was Homer Lea’s guest at the Lankershim Hotel in Los Angeles, where they made plans for the Chinese Republican Revolution.

Source: Hotel Lankershim Post Card, No. 2241, Edw. H. Mitchell, San Francisco, Calif., circa 1910.

HLRS-10071. Elihu Root

In June 1911, the Leas visited Washington D.C., where they obtained a passport and Homer Lea tried to solicit government support for a Chinese revolution. He approached Senator Elihu Root (seen here, circa 1909), a former Secretary of War and champion of military reform, who was his choice when dedicating The Valor of Ignorance. Lea warned him of an imminent revolution and change of government in China, but Root made no promises.

Source: Library of Congress, No. LC-B-725-12.

HLRS-10072. Kaiser Wilhelm

German Emperor, Kaiser Wilhelm II thought highly of The Valor of Ignorance and The Day of the Saxon.

Source: Kaiser Wilhelm Post Card, No. 1564, Verlag von Gustav Liersch & Co., Berlin,1907.

HLRS-10081. Field Marshal Lord Roberts

Field Marshall Lord Frederick Sleigh Roberts, former commander-in-chief of the British Army (depicted here in a 1900 photograph), was so impressed with The Valor of Ignorance (1909) that he purchased every copy he could obtain in London to distribute to his friends and associates. He also asked Homer Lea to write a book about British defense challenges, which became The Day of the Saxon (1912).

Source: Post Card, Simon Brothers Ltd, circa 1900.

HLRS-10082. Day of the Saxon

Source: Harper and Brothers published The Day of the Saxon in June 1912.

HLRS-10083. Reventlow Day of Saxon translation

Graf Ernst zu Reventlow, a writer on international subjects, produced a German translation of The Day of the Saxon in 1913 with the revised title, Des Britischen Reiches Schicksalsstunde, Mahnwort eines Angelsachsen, which read “The British Empire’s Fateful Hour, The Warning of an Anglo Saxon General,” to popularize it for German readers.

Source: Kaiser Wilhelm Post Card, No. 1564, Verlag von Gustav Liersch & Co., Berlin,1907.

HLRS-10084. Santa Monica

When Homer Lea and his wife Ethel returned from China in May 1912, they took up residence at a small Santa Monica cottage overlooking the ocean at 135 Wadsworth Avenue. During Lea’s recuperation from his stroke, Ethel’s son, Albert H. Powers, often wheeled him along the board walk at Santa Monica Beach where they both enjoyed fishing from the pier.

Source: In and About Los Angeles (Los Angeles: E.P. Charlton & Co., 1906).

HLRS-10085. Lea in wheelchair

Homer Lea convalescing, Los Angeles, 1912.

Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10086. Rosedale Cemetary

Homer Lea’s funeral on November 2, 1912, was held at the Rosedale Cemetery in Los Angeles, where dressed in his lieutenant general’s uniform, he was cremated.

Source: Post Card, M. Rieder, Los Angeles, California, No. 4432.

HLRS-10087. Chinese Delegation 1914 Visit

In 1914, when a delegation of Chinese Nationalist League officials (seen here) visited Ethel Lea (in white dress) and asked to visit Homer Lea’s tomb, they were horrified to learn that he had been cremated and his ashes were in her home. They expected and believed he deserved a more fitting resting place.

Source: Source: Charles O. Kates Personal Papers, Mr. Brian Kates, Pomona, New York.

HLRS-10088. Vermilion Pencil film

In 1922, Japanese-born Sessue Hayakawa, a leading Hollywood film star and movie producer, adapted The Vermilion Pencil to the screen.

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10089. Douglas MacArthur

General Douglas MacArthur, commander of United States Forces in the Far East at the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, was particularly familiar with Homer Lea’s writing. According to Major General Charles A. Willoughby, MacArthur’s Chief of Intelligence in the South West Pacific during World War II, MacArthur’s defense of the Philippines rested in part on his “encyclopedic knowledge of previous campaigns in the Philippines, with particular reference to what Homer Lea had written about them.”

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10090. Clare Boothe

Journalist Clare Boothe took a great interest in Homer Lea after helped elevate him to the status of forgotten military prophet after the December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Source: Library of Congress, No. LC-USZ-120549.

HLRS-10091. Charles Laughton

On August 31, 1942, actor Charles Laughton helped promote Homer Lea’s exploits by portraying him in a Cavalcade of America NBC radio drama.

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

HLRS-10092. Arrival of the Leas’ Ashes

The Leas’ ashes arrive in Taiwan and are received by a military honor guard, April, 18, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10093. Honoring the Leas’ Ashes

Part of the ceremony honoring the Leas’ ashes, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10094. Escorting the Leas’ ashes

Military honor guard escorting the Leas’ ashes, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10095. Escorting the Leas’ ashes

Military honor guard escorting the Leas’ ashes to Yangmingshan cemetery, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10096. Marching honor guard

Military honor guard escorting the Leas’ ashes to the Yangmingshan cemetery, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10097. Marching band escort

Military marching band escorting the Leas’ ashes to the Yangmingshan cemetery, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10098. Internment Ceremony

Military honor guard flanks the Leas’ ashes at Yangmingshan cemetery interment ceremony, April 19, 1969.

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10099. Internment Ceremony

Interment ceremony for the Leas’ ashes at Yangmingshan cemetery, April 19, 1969

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10100. Internment Ceremony

Interment ceremony for the Leas’ ashes at Yangmingshan cemetery, April 19, 1969

Source: Joshua B. Powers Personal Papers, Powers Family, South Royalton, Vermont.

HLRS-10101. Chiang Kai-shek

President Chiang Kai-shek and Madame Chiang greeting Joshua B. Powers in Taiwan, April 1969.

Source: Lawrence M. Kaplan files.

Homer Lea: American Soldier of Fortune

By Dr. Lawrence M. Kaplan
“An excellent biography of a largely forgotten but extraordinary man…  His fascinating life is well told in this biography.”
― Edward M. Coffman, author of The War to End All Wars: The American Experience in World War I

976total visits,6visits today